These Women Say Man With Cancer Who Married Long Lost Love Is a Con


Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy

A Rare Cancer Makes Me Invincible No More

During a routine check-up, my gynecologist found a lump below the waist, and I was diagnosed with a rare soft tissue sarcoma that had only been discovered in approximately 20 other patients around the world. While the news was shocking for my family, I just felt numb. As a teenager I thought I was invincible, and didn't believe I could die.

Between August and November 2005 my tumor went from the size of a pea to the size of a golf ball. Following a six-hour surgery to remove the tumor, I began the first of eight rounds of chemotherapy. I lost my hair around Christmas, and during round four of chemotherapy I began to lose the use of my legs and was confined to a wheelchair. When the drive to the treatment center got too rough, my parents — who were juggling the care of a grandfather who also had cancer and caring for my younger sister —  temporarily moved us into an apartment nearby.

Chemo, Radiation, and Setbacks

In December my oncologists broke the news to my mom and fiancé: They weren’t sure if the chemotherapy was working, there was a possibility I might never walk again, and I likely wouldn’t be able to have children of my own. With that weighing on my mind, in January, I began radiation. Unfortunately, I had a bad reaction with the radiation that caused my white blood count to drop to zero. I don’t remember much of the harrowing experience, although I am told I was in and out of consciousness for a week while I battled a bad blood infection and a 104 degree fever.

Naomi Luke AlexGood news finally came in March 2006. The radiation had worked, and I was officially declared to be in remission. Suddenly, my fiancé and I began to examine the prospect of a wedding with a new outlook — one of hope for the future. Privately, I was determined that I would walk myself down the aisle on my wedding day and began to work towards that goal.

Within a few months, and after intense rehabilitation, I was still clumsy but managed to walk short distances without the help of a walker or chair. On July 9, 2006, almost a year to the date of our engagement, and almost a year after my initial diagnosis, I walked down the aisle with the help of my father to marry Alex.

An Ambulance Becomes 'Mommy's Car'

Married life was wonderful, especially when, on Christmas Eve 2007, we learned that we would become parents. After once being told I might never be a mom, we were completely elated. The day of my son Luke’s birth was one of the best days of my life. (That's Luke and Alex with me in the picture.)

Soon thereafter, however, I experienced what I believed to be an intense panic attack. I chalked it up to lack of sleep or the stresses of being a new parent. The “attacks” continued for weeks until my oncologist, fearing a brain tumor, recommended an electroencephalogram (EEG) to monitor my brainwaves. I had a seizure during the EEG and a diagnosis was made: epilepsy. The realization that I was sick again was devastating.

Capture098Suddenly, I found myself going from attentive, active stay-at-home-mom who had just conquered cancer to being unable to care for, or even be alone with, my infant son. While most people with epilepsy will get control of their seizures with medication, I was among the approximately one-third of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. My seizures were occurring twice daily and medications did not help. In fact, the seizures, which often required emergency response, were so frequent that as my son began to talk, he identified passing ambulances as “mommy’s car.” My family was forced to hire a round-the-clock caregiver for both myself and my son.

Goliath and I Face Epilepsy Together

One afternoon while watching a health news program, I saw a segment about a woman who had a similar story to mine, and eventually was able to manage her seizures with a pacemaker-like device. I learned that I was a candidate for the treatment, called vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy, in which a small generator  is implanted under the skin in the left chest and delivers mild electrical impulses to the brain via the vagus nerve in the neck.

I was 21 when I got the VNS therapy implant  in 2010, and the results were life-changing. Today, I am the mom of an active 5-year-old boy, and have become an exercise enthusiast, running 5Ks and avidly participating in Tae Kwon Do. I also have a service dog named Goliath (pictured at left with me) , who is my “right hand man.” Our bond is incredible and we support each other relentlessly, despite the fact that Goliath also lives with epilepsy.

Though I still have the occasional seizure, I am grateful. After overcoming both cancer and the challenges of a life with epilepsy, I feel extremely lucky to be alive and am writing an inspirational book about my experiences. I frequently share my story with local churches, and hope to someday go to school to become a motivational speaker.

Naomi Lewkowskiis a cancer survivor who lives in San Antonio, Texas, with her husband and son.

Last Updated:6/24/2014
Important:The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not Everyday Health.
Any opinions, advice, statements, services, advertisements, offers or other information or content expressed or made available through the Sites by third parties, including information providers, are those of the respective authors or distributors and not Everyday Health. Neither Everyday Health, its Licensors nor any third-party content providers guarantee the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any content. Furthermore, neither Everyday Health nor its Licensors endorse or are responsible for the accuracy and reliability of any opinion, advice or statement made on any of the Sites or Services by anyone other than an authorized Everyday Health or Licensor representative while acting in his/her official capacity. You may be exposed through the Sites or Services to content that violates our policies, is sexually explicit or is otherwise offensive. You access the Sites and Services at your own risk. We take no responsibility for your exposure to third party content on the Sites or the Services. Everyday Health and its Licensors do not assume, and expressly disclaim, any obligation to obtain and include any information other than that provided to it by its third party sources. It should be understood that we do not advocate the use of any product or procedure described in the Sites or through the Services, nor are we responsible for misuse of a product or procedure due to typographical error.




Video: Watch Four-Year-Old Cancer Patient 'Marry' Her Favorite Nurse

Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy
Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy images

2019 year
2019 year - Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy pictures

Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy forecast
Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy recommendations photo

Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy images
Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy pictures

Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy new images
Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy new picture

picture Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy
pictures Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy

Watch Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy video
Watch Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With Epilepsy video

Communication on this topic: Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With , cancer-marriage-baby-and-my-dog-with/
Forum on this topic: Cancer, Marriage, Baby, and My Dog With , cancer-marriage-baby-and-my-dog-with/ , cancer-marriage-baby-and-my-dog-with/

Related News


Spring 2014 shoes
How to Help the World Be a Cleaner Place
A Couple Celebrating 75 Years of Marriage Reveals Whats Kept Them Together
Claire Danes Blonde, Layered, Easy Medium Haircuts 2013
What Your Gut May Be Telling You
How to Talk to a Shy Guy
Ford Model Sadie Newman GetsCandid
Hot Christmas Drinks To Keep You Warm In This Cold Time Of The Year
Melania Trump says dont care jacket was a message
What Does 10 Pounds Of Fat Look Like You Might Be Surprised
How to Create an XL Worksheet for Continued Fractions
10 Surprising Things Guys Love About 69ing
One in four people refuse to take a break at work
Sessions has said theres no reason to doubt Moores accusers




Date: 04.12.2018, 14:07 / Views: 33445